ANNUAL REPORT of the STATE BOARD of CHARITIES                                         p 998-999
A TABLE showing the number of Paupers supported at the public expense in the county of KINGS,  during the twelve months preceding April 21, 1823, with other particulars, derived from public documents and reports furnished the Secretary of State.
TOWNS Total number of paupers
supported during the
whole of the last year.
Total number relieved
during a part of the last year.
M
A
L
E
S
F
E
M
A
L
E
S
C
H
I
L
D
R
E
N
Total expenses of supporting and relieving paupers (including fees and expenses of officers, removals and appeals) for the last year.

Dolls.    Cts.

Expenses and cost of officers and appeals during same period.

 

Dolls.   Cts.

Number of paupers removed during the last year.
Brooklyn 54 Not Stated 23 31 20 1,785.00 510.00 22
Bushwick No return.              
Flatbush No return.              
Flatlands   No return.             ...
Gravesend No return.              
New-Utrecht No return.              
 In Brooklyn there are 54 paupers, consisting of 13 men, 21 women, 13 boys and 7 girls employed mostly in picking oakum, to the amount of 31 cwt., sold for $139.50.  There were 254 yards of cloth made and used in the house.  The whole amount of the expenses yearly, is $1,785.  Twenty-two paupers were removed; there were two appeals; the taxes raised in 1817 were $1,617; in 1818 and 1819, they were reduced to $1,600 each year; in 1821 they were only $300, and in 1822 only $600.  The town has an alms-house under the management of two overseers and one keeper, having a separate house for an hospital attended by a very respectable physician.  The present law for the settlement of the poor, passed April 8, 1813, is very deficient in its provisions, as it does not give any authority to the overseers, to make salutary rules for the good order of the house, nor any discretion to coerce the obstinate or punish the refractory; they having only one remedy in all cases to expel them the house, which in the severity of winter would be little short of murder.  If the overseers could confine the impudent and refractory in solitary places, and keep them on bread and water, it would have a good effect.  To prevent, however, any improper severity, it may be made the duty of the justices and supervisor once a year at least, to inspect the whole economy of the house.  It is very proper to keep the poor employed in something useful.  I cannot think at present of any thing more useful than the manufacture of flannel, after the manner it is made in Wales.  For this there will be a constant demand, as the most of that now imported, is very slightly made.  If this manufactory is not too difficult and too expensive, I think it will be of great public utility.  It is indispensable that the children should be educated; but in some alms-houses, (as it is in ours at present,) there may be none able to teach the children; and on account of disorders, incident to public places, it would be improper and ungenerous to send them to the public district school; the children must remain uneducated, or some provision must be made to hire a teacher.  Would it not be right to give the alms-house a particular demand on the school fund? [Letter from E. Barkeloo, Esq.] 

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