ANNUAL REPORT of the SECRETARY OF STATE                                         p    983-985
A TABLE showing the number of Paupers supported at the public expense in the county of DELAWARE, during the twelve months preceding April 21, 1823, with other particulars, derived from public documents and reports furnished the Secretary of State.
TOWNS Total number of paupers
supported during the
whole of the last year.
Total number relieved
during a part of the last year.
M
A
L
E
S
F
E
M
A
L
E
S
C
H
I
L
D
R
E
N
Total expenses of supporting and relieving paupers (including fees and expenses of officers, removals and appeals) for the last year.

Dolls.    Cts.

Expenses and cost of officers and appeals during same period.

 

Dolls.   Cts.

Number of paupers removed during the last year.
Note:   *** indicates "No return."
 Andes  2 1 1 2 0 91.00 4.50  
  Bovina 0 2 0 2 0 29.59 Not stated.  
  Colchester 0 9 4 5 2 50.50 7.00  
  Davenport 2 1 1 2 1 122.25 7.81  
  Delhi 7 1 4 4 1 369.92 74.25  
  Franklin 1 1 1 1 0 98.94 15.00  
  Hancock 4 0 2 2 1 160.00 13.00  
  Harpersfield
    ***
               
  Kortright 3 7 4 6 5 179.41 85.36 5
  Masonville 1 0 1 0 0 63.00 4.50  
  Meredith 6 1 2 5 4 383.37 1/2 Not stated.  
  Middletown
    ***
               
  Roxbury
     ***
               
  Sidney
     ***
               
  Stamford 2 3 2 3 3 91.00 10.00 1
  Tompkins
     ***
               
  Walton 2 7 3 6 7 126.12 1/2 23.00 1
   Sums of money raised by tax, in the county of Delaware, for the support of the poor, in the years 1816 1817, 1818, 1819, 1820, 1821, 1822.

          In the year 1816,                                                  $   678.30
                           1817,                                                       974.45
                           1818,                                                    1,045.32
                           1819,                                                    1,391.29
                           1820,                                                    1,119.16
                           1821,                                                    1,421.66
                           1822,                                                    1,393.95
                           
Constables fees for removing paupers during the said years,  875.00

                 Total,                                                            $ 8,899.13

     The town of Meredith has a fund of $459, for the support of the poor.  And the town of Stamford has a like fund of $320 dollars.

FRANKLIN.

   There is no poor house, nor house of industry in said town or county of Delaware; and in answering the last inquiry of the Secretary, it may be observed that the object intended by the legislature, (which was probably to lessen or abolish all expenses on appeals, transportation, and also the hardships in separating parent and child) does not affect this town, as those evils happen not to have existed in this town the preceding year.  Yet if the enquiry went back to any preceding year, a few cases giving a a character to cruelty and expense, could be found. In the year 1818 and 1819, a man between 70 and 80 years of age, travelling through the town, fell sick, and was partially deranged.--From the best account that could be gathered, he was thought to belong to New-Berlin, to which town he was removed.  It turned out, that he did not belong there, and this town had to pay the expense of keeping him there, with some cost on appeal, and bring him back. On a re-examination, it was thought he might belong to the town of Williamstown, in Massachusetts, and their existing laws laying heavy penalties on any person bringing poor persons to that place, gave rise to the propriety of taking him there in a clandestine manner.  He was decoyed there in the night, and left, the Lord knows where, old, deranged and infirm!  It would seem that a poor house or house of industry, either in the town, or county, would in a great measure, deter many persons from applying for relief, except in cases of absolute necessity.  In fact necessity will only drive them to such a house; while the present mode affords to the poor, boarding with some of their relations, and many times at home.  It gives encouragement to the indolent not to use their utmost exertions to avoid a state of poverty.  And since our adjoining states have passed penal laws to prevent paupers from being brought there from other states (although ever so legally settled there) the greater part of the system of transportation falls to the ground.  It might as well be made to apply generally to towns, and the unfortunate poor to become chargeable wherever misfortune overtakes them.  Penal laws cautiously guarding against all impositions which may be got up by towns, of hurrying paupers from town to town, or it might be best to abolish only certain parts, relating to the transportation of the poor.  [Letter from the supervisor of Franklin.]

STAMFORD

   The people of Stamford are very well satisfied with the poor laws as they now are.  We should be apprehensive that any alteration in the system, might operate injuriously to our interests.  Especially we hope that the legislature will not make it compulsory on any towns, or grant liberty to counties to erect houses of industry.  We think that the legislature went far enough last session, in giving this power, to those towns that should wish to exercise it.  It would be a detriment to this town, for instance, to contribute to the expense of erecting a poor house in this county.  We should first lose our funds, and then we should be driven to taxation, and at last the poor could not be so cheaply, and I may add, so comfortably supported.  I do not think, that a majority of the supervisors of this county, would sanction a measure of this kind; unless required to it, but at all events, it is to be hoped that they may not have the power.  As it is with this town, so I have reason to believe, is the case with country towns in general, in respect to houses of industry.  [Letter from the supervisor of Stamford.]

WALTON

   Our general practice of assisting the poor, is when there is a family needy in order to prevent their being thrown on the town, our poor masters are requested to give them occasional assistance, and find good places for them to put their children to service.  [Letter from the supervisor of Walton.]

 

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